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Share this topic on FacebookShare this topic on DiggShare this topic on RedditShare this topic on StumbleUpon Topic: Friday The 13th (2009) Discussion  (Read 54982 times)
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Spectre1428
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« Reply #300 on: July 19, 2010, 12:19:31 PM »

I can only think of distutbia and Nick and Nora's infinite playlist.

Those two movies are most likely his most popular, next to the two horror remakes.
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Zombiemaniac
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« Reply #301 on: July 19, 2010, 08:18:21 PM »

There was a debate on a horror forum if Ginny's ruse was more plausible or Jason taking whitney hostage as a way to keep his mother alive in his demented mind, My take on this is he already had a pitcure locket of his mom and her severed head so why would he need his young mom look alike in the flesh though both acts don't sound too far off because Jason was already having hallucinations and hearing his mom when she wasn't actually there.
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jimmyd
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« Reply #302 on: July 19, 2010, 10:23:20 PM »

Him taking whitney hostage was one of my biggest problems with the film...her death in the beginning...and clay finding her body would have had a better response from the audience... I'm not sure if I  worded that correctly..?? Lol
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locdasmoke
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« Reply #303 on: July 20, 2010, 06:21:22 PM »

Yeah i get what u mean jimmy. That would probably have worked better, but honestly though i never really had a problem with the hostage part because it reminded me of part 2 where the girl puts on the sweater, but i do have to agree with what u said, finding the body later on would have worked way better and to have jenna survive instead of killing her off. Imo jenna's character brought more to the table then the dude's sister
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Zombiemaniac
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« Reply #304 on: July 20, 2010, 07:43:53 PM »

Yeah i get what u mean jimmy. That would probably have worked better, but honestly though i never really had a problem with the hostage part because it reminded me of part 2 where the girl puts on the sweater, but i do have to agree with what u said, finding the body later on would have worked way better and to have jenna survive instead of killing her off. Imo jenna's character brought more to the table then the dude's sister


What was so appealing about Jenna's character ? I thought she was okay but I wished she had not had been so over friendly like I mean who would offer to be the last one out if a killer is chasing it's irrevelant to be altruistic when you're life is on the line hell I would have shove  even both Whitney and Clay out of the way so I could get through
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jimmyd
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« Reply #305 on: July 20, 2010, 11:43:48 PM »

Lol that would have been funny to see the 3 of them fighting/pushing to get though the hole first...
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locdasmoke
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« Reply #306 on: July 21, 2010, 02:50:19 PM »


What was so appealing about Jenna's character ? I thought she was okay but I wished she had not had been so over friendly like I mean who would offer to be the last one out if a killer is chasing it's irrevelant to be altruistic when you're life is on the line hell I would have shove  even both Whitney and Clay out of the way so I could get through

I just liked Jenna's character, she just had a lot goin for her IMO and actually is one of the only people in the movie I remembered the name of when the movie was over.
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Zombiemaniac
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« Reply #307 on: July 21, 2010, 06:29:34 PM »

 
 If they ever make a sequel to this movie they need to put in female version of Tommy Jarvis or get a female character like Marybeth from hatchet who was steady,smart, and kick butt and was kind enough to stop and save people from the killer but still has her own survival instict at the same time.
 
« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 08:18:15 PM by Zombiemaniac » Logged
Pine Hurst
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« Reply #308 on: July 21, 2010, 08:12:50 PM »

Jenna is supposed to the good girl of the movie, but she has the hottest outfit. In my opinion anyway.
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hesvor
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« Reply #309 on: July 21, 2010, 10:14:02 PM »

Jenna is supposed to the good girl of the movie, but she has the hottest outfit. In my opinion anyway.
yeah she was good alright ... good and smokin' hot !
probably the only F13th movie i could watch on 'mute' lol
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Pine Hurst
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« Reply #310 on: August 15, 2010, 09:43:13 PM »

I wonder if I'm the only one who notices this? When Bree rolls off of Trent, she lefts her legs up, and there seems to be a almost split second bush shot.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2010, 09:45:05 PM by Pine Hurst » Logged
Batty Part 2
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« Reply #311 on: August 16, 2010, 03:48:56 PM »

Okay, I watched this again last night, mostly because I've never said anything of substance in this thread before. I wanted to have more to say than, "I wasn't really impressed with this film."

And, still, I'm not impressed overall. However, it does have some good points and I begun to appreciate them.

First, the flashback scene. This version of Mrs. Voorhees is a sad, insane old women who doesn't seem to understand if her child is even alive. Betsy Palmer was a great psycho. A sociopath if you will. I got the impression that she would have killed regardless of what happened to Jason. It was just in her blood. She was a cold-blooded killer, plain and simple. But in this version, I don't see that. This version of Mrs. Voorhees is really sad. She's still a nut, but I sincerely believe that what happened to Jason triggered her actions. I really felt for her. And when Jason finds her corpse, you feel for him to. I've never once felt bad for Jason in a movie before. But the remake captured this.

The next scene had some great stuff, some cop-out stuff and some just plain horrible stuff. The characterization of the characters was just crap. Whitney and Mike weren't too bad though. The writers really went out of their way to differentiate Mike and Whitney from the rest of the group--which is good, don't get me wrong, but they did it by making Wade, Richie and Amanda absolutely horrible characters, rather than making Mike and Whitney stronger characters. But Mike has a great line: "Have sex with your boyfriend in a cramped tent, drink too much, blow some chunks in the woods, and we'll go back Monday and deal with whatever." He comes across as sincere with this line. It's not wonderfully written, but the sincerity comes across in the delivery--something that sheds some light on Nick Mennell's abilities as an actor.

Jason's developed an even darker side in this version. He doesn't just kill you; he screws with you. When Amanda is burning in her sleeping bag while Richie, caught in a bear trap, is forced to watch and listen to her screams, we see, for the first time in the series, how truly evil and demented Jason Voorhees really is. It's not a matter of killing for him. It's more about humiliation, establishing dominance and making people suffer. Remember this. We'll come back to it.

Some of the best atmospheric tension from the film comes when Mike and Whitney are exploring the old camp. Two shots really stand out. One, is all the whistles hanging on the wall. It gives a humanity to the place: There were really people here once. Why are they no longer here? What happened to them? People, 30 years earlier, blew on those whistles. It's a connection to that past, a tangible object that can connect Whitney to Alice. The other shot, is of Jason's bed, with his name stenciled into it. One of my critiques of the Halloween remake was the over-humanization of Michael Myers. I felt Rob Zombie altered the character too much by giving him a motive other than insanity and pure evil. However, the humanization of Jason is something I've longed for overall in the series since Part 2. His humanity in Part 2 was merely grazed upon (the fact that Jason eats ["living off of wild animals and vegetation], uses a toilet, can be interacted with and reasoned with by child psychology), but I thought it added another dimension to a character that was decidedly without dimension. I am not a fan of the characterization of the standard teen fodder in this film, but this is the best characterization of Jason in any Friday the 13th movie.

Jason is complex now. He again has emotions and can be reasoned with. Plus, remember what I said about his goal not being just death, but something else? He's no longer the Wolf Man or the shark in Jaws here. He's not just slicing through bodies, with the end result being much more important than the method. Now, he's enjoying the journey over the destination--taking time and cunning to barbecue women and make sure people are forced to see it--including the audience. Because of this, it is totally believable and within the character to keep Whitney alive. This is a stroke of genius in the film. Many, many fans abhorred this, and I would too if this were the Kane Hodder Jason from Part VII. But it's not. This is a new Jason, a new Friday the 13th universe--all the rules can be rewritten; all the established preconceived notions can be thrown out the window. What's the crowning achievement of this film? That not even die-hard Jason fans know what to expect next.

Jason's tunnel system is also pure genius, giving credence to the scene--in any Friday film--where he just popped up out of no where. I also love to see him do things like sharpen his machete and have a temper tantrum. Jason is a character now, one who makes choices (does he wear the bag? Or the goalie mask now? Does he kill Whitney or let her live?), uses ingenuity (the tunnel system), experiences forethought and makes preparations (sharpening his machete) and has emotions (his temper tantrum in the tunnel after not being able to locate Clay and Jenna).

By far, and without a shadow of doubt, the best characterization of Jason, ever. And most fans hated it. Why? Was it not us--the fans--who put Jason on a pedestal and made him the anti-hero that he would be portrayed as in the 2009 film? We identified with Jason--not the teenage victims--and filled in our own ideas of his characterization when the filmmakers failed to do so. Really, people who are unhappy with this film, may need to look at themselves as a potential catalyst for the character's new direction before biting Nispel's head off.

Also, Derek Mears is a wonderful Jason, bringing back visions of Steve Daskawisz or Ted White. The slow, lumbering performance of guys like Hodder and Kerzinger clearly would not work in a film where Jason is more of a character than an undead moron. Mears' performance is anything but subtle. He rollercaosters through surprise (when Whitney calls him Jason) anger (his tantrum) brutality (when he's going after Whitney with the machete) and even recollection when he sees his mother's locket. While it may not be beyond the range of the previous Jasons as actors, this Jason does appear to be lightyears beyond who the filmmakers of previous generations wanted Jason to be. Mears steals the show.

However, the rest of the film is bland and reminds me of Part III or even the Final Chapter. Each installment had a new element--a gimmick almost. The first one was the gimmick, because it started it all. Part 2's gimmick was the introduction of Jason the killer. The gimmick in five, was the impostor. Six had the comedic aspect and Gothic horror overtones while seven had real match for Jason in the form of the telekinetic Tina. Eight took Jason out of the camp. Nine was more polished and aimed at a slightly older and more sophisticated audience. Ten took Jason into another time and location. Part III was just kids getting offed in the woods. To a lesser extent, the same could be said for The Final Chapter, but it introduced a child character for the first time. But, unless you consider 3-D the gimmick (and by gimmick, I mean something in the story) Part III is the shallowest of them all. But the remake isn't much better. Apart from Jason's characterization, the rest of the film is flat and dull and lifeless.

The cast of characters is a rogue's gallery of teen movie cliches: We've got the blond, rich 80's douche guy; the slut; the token black dude; and the Shellyesque nerd who you know would never be asked to hang out by the blond douchebag. We've also got the sweet, final girl, girl-next-door type and the rugged but warm outsider guy on a motorcycle. Add in two nobodies with a combined six lines of dialogue to up the body count and you've got Friday the 13th.

Trent's so aggravating and cliched, I can't even see him as a character. And who uses the word "stupendous" during sex? Lawrence has to be a racial stereotype. I know no African-Americans who act like him. "You ask the one black guy to pump the gas?" "Why does it have to be rap? Because I'm black I can't listen to Green Day?" That second line--the one about Green Day--would have been great if it weren't for the fact that Lawrence does not defy any racial stereotypes. He just whines about them. Yes, he is black and he does listen to rap. So why should he be offended by being associated with rap? Who knows. I really think the filmmakers were scared of making the fodder to complex. Maybe they wanted us to identify with Jason more. Chewie is a character, but only in the sense that Kramer from Seinfeld is a character: Rather than being a real person, he becomes a parody of one. It's genius in the comedic world of Seinfeld, and obnoxious in the realm of Friday the 13th. Bree is just there. She offers nothing and is nobody as a character. I suppose her function is to lure Jenna from Trent, widening the gap between them and giving the audience a reason to root for Jenna and Clay. But other than boobs and sex during a Santogold song, Bree has nothing with which to lure anyone. Even Trent. But it's in the script, so it had to happen--giving the storyline a square-peg-crammed-into-a-round-hole feel to it. There's also the two nobodies who Jason kills while water skiing. But there's nothing to say about them, and it's not because I don't recall their characterization. it's because it wasn't there.

The only real characters besides Jason are Jenna and Clay. Clay seems a little to well composed and ready to spar off and posture in front of Trent to be worried about his sister. He ping-pongs back and forth between being "the other dude" and being genuinely concerned about his sister. I mean, am I the only one who thought that, with Trent's attitude and zero situational awareness about Jason, that Trent, in Clay's eyes, could be and should be a suspect in his sister's disappearance? But does Clay investigate this? Nah, he rides off into the sunset with Trent's girl--a girl to nice and sweet to be believable as Trent's girlfriend in the first place. The characterization of these two was better than the rest, but sometimes shaky and inconsistent. But it was enough to make you root for them.

As expected, Jason cuts through Lawrence, Chewie, Bree and Trent before we're down to Jenna and Clay and--Whitney! The reintroduction does not exactly pose the question of "who will be the final girl?" which is what makes Jenna's murder a bit shocking. Shocking as it may be, it is very satisfying. If Clay destroyed the monster, saved his sister and got the girl, it would have been too much and it would have come off as hokey--and a happy ending would be out of place in this film. Someone had to die. But Jenna's likable enough that her death is met more with a sense of loss and despair instead of a raucous cheer of delight as many other Jason kills are.

Overall, the film went in the right direction, but didn't quite arrive at its destination. It's much better than I think some people give it credit for, but it is certainly flawed. When the film is working, it's firing on all cylinders, and when its not it's sputtering and about to stall. The middle ground in there is that it is average.  
« Last Edit: August 16, 2010, 03:57:58 PM by Batty Part 2 » Logged
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« Reply #312 on: August 16, 2010, 11:34:08 PM »

Okay, I watched this again last night, mostly because I've never said anything of substance in this thread before. I wanted to have more to say than, "I wasn't really impressed with this film."

And, still, I'm not impressed overall. However, it does have some good points and I begun to appreciate them.

First, the flashback scene. This version of Mrs. Voorhees is a sad, insane old women who doesn't seem to understand if her child is even alive. Betsy Palmer was a great psycho. A sociopath if you will. I got the impression that she would have killed regardless of what happened to Jason. It was just in her blood. She was a cold-blooded killer, plain and simple. But in this version, I don't see that. This version of Mrs. Voorhees is really sad. She's still a nut, but I sincerely believe that what happened to Jason triggered her actions. I really felt for her. And when Jason finds her corpse, you feel for him to. I've never once felt bad for Jason in a movie before. But the remake captured this.

The next scene had some great stuff, some cop-out stuff and some just plain horrible stuff. The characterization of the characters was just crap. Whitney and Mike weren't too bad though. The writers really went out of their way to differentiate Mike and Whitney from the rest of the group--which is good, don't get me wrong, but they did it by making Wade, Richie and Amanda absolutely horrible characters, rather than making Mike and Whitney stronger characters. But Mike has a great line: "Have sex with your boyfriend in a cramped tent, drink too much, blow some chunks in the woods, and we'll go back Monday and deal with whatever." He comes across as sincere with this line. It's not wonderfully written, but the sincerity comes across in the delivery--something that sheds some light on Nick Mennell's abilities as an actor.

Jason's developed an even darker side in this version. He doesn't just kill you; he screws with you. When Amanda is burning in her sleeping bag while Richie, caught in a bear trap, is forced to watch and listen to her screams, we see, for the first time in the series, how truly evil and demented Jason Voorhees really is. It's not a matter of killing for him. It's more about humiliation, establishing dominance and making people suffer. Remember this. We'll come back to it.

Some of the best atmospheric tension from the film comes when Mike and Whitney are exploring the old camp. Two shots really stand out. One, is all the whistles hanging on the wall. It gives a humanity to the place: There were really people here once. Why are they no longer here? What happened to them? People, 30 years earlier, blew on those whistles. It's a connection to that past, a tangible object that can connect Whitney to Alice. The other shot, is of Jason's bed, with his name stenciled into it. One of my critiques of the Halloween remake was the over-humanization of Michael Myers. I felt Rob Zombie altered the character too much by giving him a motive other than insanity and pure evil. However, the humanization of Jason is something I've longed for overall in the series since Part 2. His humanity in Part 2 was merely grazed upon (the fact that Jason eats ["living off of wild animals and vegetation], uses a toilet, can be interacted with and reasoned with by child psychology), but I thought it added another dimension to a character that was decidedly without dimension. I am not a fan of the characterization of the standard teen fodder in this film, but this is the best characterization of Jason in any Friday the 13th movie.

Jason is complex now. He again has emotions and can be reasoned with. Plus, remember what I said about his goal not being just death, but something else? He's no longer the Wolf Man or the shark in Jaws here. He's not just slicing through bodies, with the end result being much more important than the method. Now, he's enjoying the journey over the destination--taking time and cunning to barbecue women and make sure people are forced to see it--including the audience. Because of this, it is totally believable and within the character to keep Whitney alive. This is a stroke of genius in the film. Many, many fans abhorred this, and I would too if this were the Kane Hodder Jason from Part VII. But it's not. This is a new Jason, a new Friday the 13th universe--all the rules can be rewritten; all the established preconceived notions can be thrown out the window. What's the crowning achievement of this film? That not even die-hard Jason fans know what to expect next.

Jason's tunnel system is also pure genius, giving credence to the scene--in any Friday film--where he just popped up out of no where. I also love to see him do things like sharpen his machete and have a temper tantrum. Jason is a character now, one who makes choices (does he wear the bag? Or the goalie mask now? Does he kill Whitney or let her live?), uses ingenuity (the tunnel system), experiences forethought and makes preparations (sharpening his machete) and has emotions (his temper tantrum in the tunnel after not being able to locate Clay and Jenna).

By far, and without a shadow of doubt, the best characterization of Jason, ever. And most fans hated it. Why? Was it not us--the fans--who put Jason on a pedestal and made him the anti-hero that he would be portrayed as in the 2009 film? We identified with Jason--not the teenage victims--and filled in our own ideas of his characterization when the filmmakers failed to do so. Really, people who are unhappy with this film, may need to look at themselves as a potential catalyst for the character's new direction before biting Nispel's head off.

Also, Derek Mears is a wonderful Jason, bringing back visions of Steve Daskawisz or Ted White. The slow, lumbering performance of guys like Hodder and Kerzinger clearly would not work in a film where Jason is more of a character than an undead moron. Mears' performance is anything but subtle. He rollercaosters through surprise (when Whitney calls him Jason) anger (his tantrum) brutality (when he's going after Whitney with the machete) and even recollection when he sees his mother's locket. While it may not be beyond the range of the previous Jasons as actors, this Jason does appear to be lightyears beyond who the filmmakers of previous generations wanted Jason to be. Mears steals the show.

However, the rest of the film is bland and reminds me of Part III or even the Final Chapter. Each installment had a new element--a gimmick almost. The first one was the gimmick, because it started it all. Part 2's gimmick was the introduction of Jason the killer. The gimmick in five, was the impostor. Six had the comedic aspect and Gothic horror overtones while seven had real match for Jason in the form of the telekinetic Tina. Eight took Jason out of the camp. Nine was more polished and aimed at a slightly older and more sophisticated audience. Ten took Jason into another time and location. Part III was just kids getting offed in the woods. To a lesser extent, the same could be said for The Final Chapter, but it introduced a child character for the first time. But, unless you consider 3-D the gimmick (and by gimmick, I mean something in the story) Part III is the shallowest of them all. But the remake isn't much better. Apart from Jason's characterization, the rest of the film is flat and dull and lifeless.

The cast of characters is a rogue's gallery of teen movie cliches: We've got the blond, rich 80's douche guy; the slut; the token black dude; and the Shellyesque nerd who you know would never be asked to hang out by the blond douchebag. We've also got the sweet, final girl, girl-next-door type and the rugged but warm outsider guy on a motorcycle. Add in two nobodies with a combined six lines of dialogue to up the body count and you've got Friday the 13th.

Trent's so aggravating and cliched, I can't even see him as a character. And who uses the word "stupendous" during sex? Lawrence has to be a racial stereotype. I know no African-Americans who act like him. "You ask the one black guy to pump the gas?" "Why does it have to be rap? Because I'm black I can't listen to Green Day?" That second line--the one about Green Day--would have been great if it weren't for the fact that Lawrence does not defy any racial stereotypes. He just whines about them. Yes, he is black and he does listen to rap. So why should he be offended by being associated with rap? Who knows. I really think the filmmakers were scared of making the fodder to complex. Maybe they wanted us to identify with Jason more. Chewie is a character, but only in the sense that Kramer from Seinfeld is a character: Rather than being a real person, he becomes a parody of one. It's genius in the comedic world of Seinfeld, and obnoxious in the realm of Friday the 13th. Bree is just there. She offers nothing and is nobody as a character. I suppose her function is to lure Jenna from Trent, widening the gap between them and giving the audience a reason to root for Jenna and Clay. But other than boobs and sex during a Santogold song, Bree has nothing with which to lure anyone. Even Trent. But it's in the script, so it had to happen--giving the storyline a square-peg-crammed-into-a-round-hole feel to it. There's also the two nobodies who Jason kills while water skiing. But there's nothing to say about them, and it's not because I don't recall their characterization. it's because it wasn't there.

The only real characters besides Jason are Jenna and Clay. Clay seems a little to well composed and ready to spar off and posture in front of Trent to be worried about his sister. He ping-pongs back and forth between being "the other dude" and being genuinely concerned about his sister. I mean, am I the only one who thought that, with Trent's attitude and zero situational awareness about Jason, that Trent, in Clay's eyes, could be and should be a suspect in his sister's disappearance? But does Clay investigate this? Nah, he rides off into the sunset with Trent's girl--a girl to nice and sweet to be believable as Trent's girlfriend in the first place. The characterization of these two was better than the rest, but sometimes shaky and inconsistent. But it was enough to make you root for them.

As expected, Jason cuts through Lawrence, Chewie, Bree and Trent before we're down to Jenna and Clay and--Whitney! The reintroduction does not exactly pose the question of "who will be the final girl?" which is what makes Jenna's murder a bit shocking. Shocking as it may be, it is very satisfying. If Clay destroyed the monster, saved his sister and got the girl, it would have been too much and it would have come off as hokey--and a happy ending would be out of place in this film. Someone had to die. But Jenna's likable enough that her death is met more with a sense of loss and despair instead of a raucous cheer of delight as many other Jason kills are.

Overall, the film went in the right direction, but didn't quite arrive at its destination. It's much better than I think some people give it credit for, but it is certainly flawed. When the film is working, it's firing on all cylinders, and when its not it's sputtering and about to stall. The middle ground in there is that it is average. 

Thats a damn good post batty
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Pine Hurst
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« Reply #313 on: October 07, 2010, 11:22:45 PM »

I watched this movie again yesterday. I like it quite a bit better than usual. I now rank this one way up there in the series. There's some things could've been better, but as entertainment, it flows really well.

I think it works better if you don't look at it as a remake or a platinum dunes movie, but more of an unoffical sequel or something.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2010, 11:34:09 PM by Pine Hurst » Logged
Struckworld
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« Reply #314 on: October 14, 2010, 07:34:35 PM »

I liked the remake but I didn't like The kids knowing about jason outside of the house. So they stayed inside and cried like whiny little bitches. I like it when the kids were unsuspecting about jason, and he'd kill them off one by one without no one knowing until the last person.
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